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Lesson Plan

Reality vs. fiction - Believe or make believe

Kindergarten (K) - ELA

Special Education Teaching Resources and IEP Goal Bank | TeachTastic

LEARNING TARGET

  • Students will be able to differentiate between reality and fiction.
  • Students will be able to, with prompting and support, describe the relationship between reality and fiction.
Special Education Teaching Resources and IEP Goal Bank | TeachTastic

LEARNING PROGRESSION

PREREQUISITE SKILL

-

EXTENSION SKILL

-

DURATION

  • Introduction (5 minutes) Instruction (15 minutes)
  • Guided Practice (15 minutes)
  • Independent Practice (15 minutes)
  • Exit Card Formative Assessment (5 minutes)
  • Closure (5 minutes)

MATERIALS

  • Picture cards of real and make-believe objects and scenarios
  • Two labeled boxes or containers (one for reality, one for make-believe)
  • Whiteboard and markers

VOCABULARY

  • Reality
  • Make-believe
  • Fiction
  • True
  • False
Special Education Teaching Resources and IEP Goal Bank | TeachTastic

TEACHING RESOURCES

CENTERS & TASK CARDS

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No Centers or Task Cards Available

IEP GOAL WORKBOOKS

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No Goals Available

WORKSHEET PACKS

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No Worksheet Packs Available

5 AND 1 INTERVENTIONS

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No Interventions Available

GAMES

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No Games Available

ACTIVITIES

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No Activities Available

Special Education Teaching Resources and IEP Goal Bank | TeachTastic

LESSON INSTRUCTION

INTRODUCTION

  1. Begin by explaining the difference between reality (things that are true and really happen) and make-believe (things that are not true and only happen in stories).
  2. Show students a few picture cards, one at a time, and ask them if the image represents reality or make-believe.

INSTRUCTION

  1. Explain that some things can be real and some can be make-believe. Give examples (e.g., a real dog vs. a talking dog in a story).
  2. Introduce the two labeled boxes (reality and make-believe) and explain that they will be sorting picture cards into the correct boxes.

GUIDED PRACTICE

  1. Divide the students into small groups and provide each group with a set of picture cards.
  2. Instruct the students to work together to sort the cards into the reality and make-believe boxes.
  3. Circulate around the room to provide support and guidance as needed.

    INDEPENDENT PRACTICE

    1. Instruct students to work independently to sort a new set of picture cards into the reality and make-believe boxes.
    2. Monitor students' progress and provide support as needed.

      HOMEWORK

      1. Assign students to find examples of reality and make-believe in their favorite books or TV shows.
      2. Encourage students to share their examples with the class during the next lesson.

        EXIT TICKET

        1. Provide each student with a whiteboard and marker.
        2. Instruct students to write one example of something from reality and one example of something from make-believe.

          ASSESSMENT

          1. Formative assessments will be conducted during the lesson to monitor students' understanding of reality and make-believe.
          2. The exit ticket and progress monitoring assessments will be used to determine students' mastery of differentiating between reality and fiction.

            CLOSURE

            1. Review the difference between reality and make-believe.
            2. Ask students to share what they learned about reality and make-believe and why it is important to know the difference.

              EXTENSION

              1. Students can create their own picture cards illustrating real and make-believe scenarios.
              2. Students can practice identifying reality and make-believe in stories read aloud in class.

              INTERVENTION

              1. For students who struggle with understanding the concept, provide additional examples and explanations.
              2. For students who need extra support, pair them with a partner who has a strong grasp of the concept to work together on sorting tasks.

              VIDEOS

              No Video Available

              Special Education Teaching Resources and IEP Goal Bank | TeachTastic

              TEACHING TIPS

              To extend and reinforce learning after teaching the lesson, use the Real or Make-Believe Quest game as an ongoing activity throughout the school year. Regularly introduce new picture cards or scenarios, including examples from stories or topics the students are currently learning about. This will help students continuously practice their skills in differentiating between reality and fiction, while connecting the game to other subjects and areas of learning. Encourage students to share their thoughts and reflections on the game, discussing how their understanding of reality and make-believe has evolved over time.

              • Use clear, age-appropriate language: When explaining the difference between reality and make-believe, use simple words and phrases that kindergartners can easily understand.
              • Relate to familiar stories: Use examples from well-known stories, movies, or TV shows that the students are familiar with to help them grasp the concept of reality and fiction.
              • Encourage group discussion: Give students opportunities to share their thoughts and ideas with their classmates. This will help reinforce their understanding and promote critical thinking.
              Special Education Teaching Resources and IEP Goal Bank | TeachTastic

              STUDENT MISCONCEPTIONS

              • Confusing real-life situations with make-believe: Young children may not fully understand the difference between reality and fiction, and may sometimes confuse elements of stories with real-life situations.
              • Believing that all animals can talk: Students may have been exposed to many fictional stories that feature talking animals, leading them to believe that all animals can talk in reality.
              • Assuming that everything they see on TV or read in books is true: Young children may not yet have developed the ability to critically evaluate the content they consume, so they may assume that everything they see or read is a reflection of reality.
              Special Education Teaching Resources and IEP Goal Bank | TeachTastic

              STANDARD

              Common Core Standard:

              RL.K.7 - With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts).

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