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Lesson Plan

Counting up to 3 - Shape Counting to 3

Kindergarten (K) - Math

Special Education Teaching Resources and IEP Goal Bank | TeachTastic

LEARNING TARGET

  • Students will be able to identify and count shapes up to 3.
  • Students will be able to sort and group shapes based on their characteristics.
Special Education Teaching Resources and IEP Goal Bank | TeachTastic

LEARNING PROGRESSION

PREREQUISITE SKILL

  • Students will be able to count to 3 using visual aids.

EXTENSION SKILL

  • Students will be able to count and identify numbers 1-3.
  • Students will be able to represent numbers 1-3 with objects.
  • Students will be able to place objects in a line from left to right to represent counting.

DURATION

  • Introduction (5 minutes)
  • Instruction (15 minutes)
  • Guided Practice (15 minutes)
  • Independent Practice (15 minutes)
  • Exit Card Formative Assessment (5 minutes)
  • Closure (5 minutes)

MATERIALS

  • Shape cutouts (circle, square, triangle)
  • Container to hold the shapes
  • Whiteboard and markers

VOCABULARY

  • Circle
  • Square
  • Triangle
  • Count
  • Sort
  • Group
Special Education Teaching Resources and IEP Goal Bank | TeachTastic

TEACHING RESOURCES

CENTERS & TASK CARDS

Touch Counting Math Center| TeachTastic IEP Teaching Resources

No Centers or Task Cards Available

IEP GOAL WORKBOOKS

Touch Counting Math Center| TeachTastic IEP Teaching Resources

No Goals Available

WORKSHEET PACKS

Touch Counting Math Center| TeachTastic IEP Teaching Resources

No Worksheet Packs Available

5 AND 1 INTERVENTIONS

Touch Counting Math Center| TeachTastic IEP Teaching Resources

No Interventions Available

GAMES

Touch Counting Math Center| TeachTastic IEP Teaching Resources

No Games Available

ACTIVITIES

Touch Counting Math Center| TeachTastic IEP Teaching Resources

No Activities Available

Special Education Teaching Resources and IEP Goal Bank | TeachTastic

LESSON INSTRUCTION

INTRODUCTION

  1. Show the students the shape cutouts (circle, square, triangle).
  2. Ask the students to name each shape and repeat their names after you.
  3. Count each shape as you hold them up.

INSTRUCTION

  1. Demonstrate how to sort and group shapes based on their characteristics.
  2. Ask students to help you sort the shapes into groups of the same shape.
  3. Encourage students to count the number of shapes in each group.

GUIDED PRACTICE

  1. Divide the students into small groups and provide each group with a container of shape cutouts.
  2. Instruct the students to work together to sort the shapes into groups of the same shape and count the number of shapes in each group.
  3. Circulate around the room to provide support and guidance as needed.

    INDEPENDENT PRACTICE

    1. Instruct students to work independently to create their own sets of shapes and sort them into groups of the same shape.
    2. Encourage students to count the number of shapes in each group.
    3. Monitor students' progress and provide support as needed.

      HOMEWORK

      1. Assign students to find shapes in their environment at home and bring them to class to share during the next lesson.
      2. Encourage students to count the number of shapes they find.

        EXIT TICKET

        1. Provide each student with a whiteboard and marker.
        2. Instruct students to draw a group of shapes and write the number of shapes in the group.

          ASSESSMENT

          1. Formative assessments will be conducted during the lesson to monitor student progress and understanding.
          2. The exit card and progress monitoring assessments will be used to determine students' mastery of the objective.

            CLOSURE

            1. Summarize the lesson by reviewing the concept of sorting and grouping shapes based on their characteristics.
            2. Encourage students to reflect on their learning by sharing one thing they learned during the lesson.

              EXTENSION

              • Students can count and group shapes up to higher numbers.
              • Students can create patterns using the shapes.
              • For students who are more advanced, they can be challenged to identify and name shapes with more sides.

              INTERVENTION

              • For students who struggle with fine motor skills, larger and easier to grasp shapes can be used.
              • For students who need extra support, a visual aid or diagram can be provided to help them understand the concept of sorting and grouping shapes.

              VIDEOS

              No Video Available

              Special Education Teaching Resources and IEP Goal Bank | TeachTastic

              TEACHING TIPS

              The Shape Sorting Race game can be used as an extension activity to reinforce the concepts taught in the counting shapes up to 3 lesson plan. The game can be played with larger sets of shapes or more complex shapes to challenge students who have already mastered the basic concepts. Additionally, the game can be modified to incorporate other concepts, such as pattern recognition or addition. The game can also be used as a fun review activity before a test or assessment. Incorporating games into lessons not only helps to reinforce learning but also makes learning more engaging and enjoyable for students.

               

              • Use visual aids: Visual aids such as shape cutouts or counting blocks can help students better understand counting concepts. These visual aids can be used to demonstrate concepts, create hands-on learning experiences, and help students connect abstract concepts to concrete objects.

              • Encourage group work: Group work can help students learn from one another, share ideas, and build problem-solving skills. By working in small groups, students can practice counting, sorting, and grouping shapes together, and support one another in their learning.

              • Incorporate movement: Incorporating movement into counting activities can help students engage in active learning and better understand counting concepts. For example, teachers can ask students to jump or hop a certain number of times, or use a counting song to get students moving and counting at the same time.

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              Special Education Teaching Resources and IEP Goal Bank | TeachTastic

              STUDENT MISCONCEPTIONS

              • Counting each shape individually: Students may count each shape individually instead of counting the number of groups. Teachers can address this misconception by demonstrating how to group shapes together based on their characteristics and count the number of groups.

              • Confusing shapes with one another: Students may confuse shapes with one another, especially shapes with similar characteristics (such as a square and a rectangle). Teachers can address this misconception by emphasizing the unique characteristics of each shape and providing opportunities for students to compare and contrast different shapes.

              • Struggling with counting higher numbers: Some students may struggle with counting higher numbers, especially if they are new to counting. Teachers can address this misconception by providing opportunities for students to practice counting, using visual aids to help students connect numbers to concrete objects, and breaking down larger numbers into smaller parts.

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              Special Education Teaching Resources and IEP Goal Bank | TeachTastic

              STANDARD

              Common Core Standard:

              K.CC.B.5 - Count to answer "how many?" questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1-20, count out that many objects.

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