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Lesson Plan

Properties - Addition Property - matching

Third (3) - Math

Special Education Teaching Resources and IEP Goal Bank | TeachTastic

LEARNING TARGET

  • Students will understand the concepts of the associative, commutative, and identity properties of addition.
  • Students will be able to identify and apply the appropriate property to match a given sample problem.
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LEARNING PROGRESSION

PREREQUISITE SKILL

-

EXTENSION SKILL

-

DURATION

  • 60 minutes

MATERIALS

  • Whiteboard or chart paper
  • Markers
  • Index cards or slips of paper
  • Worksheet (one per student)
  • Pencils
  • Exit cards

VOCABULARY

  • Associative property
  • Commutative property
  • Identity property
Special Education Teaching Resources and IEP Goal Bank | TeachTastic

TEACHING RESOURCES

CENTERS & TASK CARDS

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No Centers or Task Cards Available

IEP GOAL WORKBOOKS

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No Goals Available

WORKSHEET PACKS

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No Worksheet Packs Available

5 AND 1 INTERVENTIONS

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No Interventions Available

GAMES

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No Games Available

ACTIVITIES

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No Activities Available

Special Education Teaching Resources and IEP Goal Bank | TeachTastic

LESSON INSTRUCTION

INTRODUCTION

  1. Begin the lesson by writing the terms "Associative Property," "Commutative Property," and "Identity Property" on the board.
  2. Engage students in a brief discussion about why understanding these properties is important in mathematics. Highlight how they can help simplify calculations and solve problems more efficiently.

INSTRUCTION

  1. Explain the Associative Property:

    • Write an addition problem on the board, such as (2 + 3) + 4.
    • Explain that the associative property allows us to group the numbers differently and still get the same sum.
    • Demonstrate this by regrouping the numbers as 2 + (3 + 4) and showing that the sum remains unchanged.
  2. Explain the Commutative Property:

    • Write an addition problem on the board, such as 5 + 7.
    • Explain that the commutative property allows us to change the order of the numbers without changing the sum.
    • Demonstrate this by rewriting the problem as 7 + 5 and showing that the sum remains the same.
  3. Explain the Identity Property:

    • Write an addition problem on the board, such as 9 + 0.
    • Explain that the identity property states that adding zero to any number does not change the value of that number.
    • Show that adding 0 to 9 still results in 9.

GUIDED PRACTICE

  1. Divide the class into small groups or pairs.
  2. Distribute index cards or slips of paper with sample addition problems written on them.
  3. Instruct students to match each sample problem to the appropriate property: associative, commutative, or identity.
  4. Monitor the groups, providing guidance and clarification as needed.

    INDEPENDENT PRACTICE

    1. Distribute a worksheet to each student.
    2. Instruct students to solve the addition problems and identify the property used for each problem.
    3. Encourage students to explain their reasoning in writing.
    4. Circulate the classroom to provide support and monitor individual progress.

      HOMEWORK

      1. Assign a few additional problems for students to solve at home.
      2. Instruct students to identify the property used for each problem and explain their reasoning.

        EXIT TICKET

        1. Provide each student with an exit card.
        2. Write a sample addition problem on the board and ask students to identify the property used for that problem.
        3. Collect the exit cards for review.

          ASSESSMENT

          1. Evaluate students' worksheets, homework, and exit cards to assess their understanding of the properties of addition.
          2. Provide feedback to students, highlighting areas of strength and areas that need improvement.

            CLOSURE

            1. Recap the lesson by reviewing the concepts of associative, commutative, and identity properties of addition.
            2. Ask students to share examples of how they might apply these properties in real-life situations.

              EXTENSION

              1. Provide advanced students with more complex addition problems and challenge them to apply the properties correctly.
              2. Introduce the concept of the distributive property as an extension for students who grasp the other properties quickly.

              INTERVENTION

              1. Offer additional support and examples to students who are struggling to grasp the properties of addition.
              2. Provide extra practice opportunities or alternative explanations to reinforce their understanding.

              VIDEOS

              No Video Available

              Special Education Teaching Resources and IEP Goal Bank | TeachTastic

              TEACHING TIPS

              1. Use visual aids: Incorporate visuals, such as diagrams or manipulatives, to help students visualize the properties of addition and understand their application.
              2. Provide real-life examples: Connect the properties of addition to real-life situations to make the concept more relatable and meaningful for students.
              3. Encourage peer collaboration: Foster a collaborative learning environment where students can discuss and explain their reasoning to one another, promoting a deeper understanding of the properties.
              Special Education Teaching Resources and IEP Goal Bank | TeachTastic

              STUDENT MISCONCEPTIONS

              1. Confusing the properties: Students may mistakenly interchange the definitions and applications of the associative, commutative, and identity properties. Reinforce each property with clear examples to avoid confusion.
              2. Misidentifying properties: Students might struggle to correctly identify which property applies to a given problem. Encourage them to carefully analyze the problem and consider the properties before making a determination.
              3. Oversimplifying or overgeneralizing: Students may incorrectly assume that all addition problems exhibit the same property, or that a particular property applies universally to all operations. Emphasize the specific conditions and limitations of each property to avoid overgeneralization.
              Special Education Teaching Resources and IEP Goal Bank | TeachTastic

              STANDARD

              Common Core Standard:

              3.NBT.A.2 - Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.

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