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Top 5 Practical Classroom Desk Work Accommodations for IEP Students

Updated: May 24, 2022


Desk work accommodations often are written for students with ADHD. For children who have ADHD, body movement and fidgeting are both critical as natural ways of regulation. Addressing any ADHD student's needs in your classroom plan, whether the accommodation is in their IEP or not, will significantly benefit the overall harmony and productivity of the class.


As we know, not all accommodations work for all students, so consider your student's needs and current behaviors before applying any accommodations to a classroom setting. Don't be afraid to give things a test run before writing them in a legal document.


5 classroom desk work accommodations

Accommodation

Desk close in proximity to teacher, where ever teaching happens.


The benefit to the student

Students placed near a teacher will benefit from increased frequency of student check-ins leading to a higher percentage of on-task work time.

The benefit to the teacher

A higher percentage of on-task work time equates to less classroom disruption and a higher concentration of quality work.


Accommodation

The standing desk option provides a natural non-disruptive way to fidget.


The benefit to the student

The student's brain can focus on work tasks rather than the need to expel excess energy.

The benefit to the teacher

Students with stand up desks are less likely to seek stimuli by rolling or flopping around in a standard classroom chair. Work time equates to less classroom disruption and a higher concentration of quality work.


Accommodation

Weighted lap pads or vests can provide calm to high anxiety students, allowing them to focus more directly.


The benefit to the student

A calming effect when weight is applied to the lab for shoulders

The benefit to the teacher

The student can initiate this accommodation on their own and when needed without classroom disruption.


Accommodation