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What Happens if IEP Goals Are Not Met? | Teach Tastic

Updated: May 24, 2022

If an IEP goal is not met, it is not the end of the world. All that needs to be done is write a goal justification statement and accurately describe the student's present performance levels. This explains why the student did not meet the goal and what the partial growth looks like. We need to hold ourselves to the legal phrase "adequate years progress". If a goal can be reasonably explained and documented, there would be no reason to challenge the teacher or violate the IEP itself.

Never fall short of having great data for your IEP goals.

An IEP goal is just a goal. It is an anticipated progress point that an experienced special education teacher sets based on how the student has performed on previous goals, tasks, and learning experiences. In this article, we will explain how to write the progress report or present levels of performance statement based on what the student has mastered in the goal and what portions are still giving them challenges. Then the IEP team will decide whether to continue the goal with the remaining mastery levels in place or if the goal will get modified better to articulate the remaining skills and an appropriate objective progression. Let's begin sorting out what the options are and how they will look in the IEP.

We will use an 8th-grade standards-based solving equations IEP goal for this example.


Learning Standard, Solve linear equations with rational number coefficients, including equations whose solutions require expanding expressions using the distributive property and collecting like terms.


8.EE.C.7.B Target Goal By (date), when given problems with expressions and equations, the student will solve linear equations with rational number coefficients, including equations whose solutions require expanding expressions using the distributive property and collecting like terms improving expressions and equations skills from 0/10 work samples out of ten consecutive trials to 8/10 work samples in ten consecutive trials.


Objectives:

Solve one-step equations

By (date), when given a one-variable equation, the student will solve one-step equations including inverse operations of division and multiplication, improving expressions and equations skills from 0/10 problems out of ten consecutive trials to 8/10 problems in ten consecutive trials.


Solve two-step equations

By (date), when given a one-variable equation, the student will solve two-step equations including distribution, improving expressions and equations skills from 0/10 problems out of ten consecutive trials to 8/10 problems in ten consecutive trials.


Solve multistep equations

By (date), when given a one-variable equation including combining like terms, the student will solve multistep equations, including combining like terms, improving expressions and equations skills from 0/10 problems out of ten consecutive trials to 8/10 problems in ten consecutive trials.


Solve multistep equations with exponents

By (date), when given a one-variable equation, the student will solve for variables including inverse operations with exponents, improving expressions and equations skills from 0/10 problems out of ten consecutive trials to 8/10 problems in ten consecutive trials.


As special education teachers, we understand that it is not necessary to write goal objectives for standards-based IEP. However, when teaching a goal, objectives are essential to line out mile markers to teach the skill. This is where the progress monitoring statements get real easy to create. As you can see from the goal above, the student will start with singles step equations and then two-step with distribution.


Let's break this entire year into goal steps so you can see it logically.

  1. Single Step Equations with the inverse operation of addition and subtraction 95% out of 100 problems given.