16 Internet IEP Goals for Student Safety and Usage Skills | TeachTastic

Updated: Aug 12


Internet Safety IEP Goals

You want your special education student or child to be technologically savvy, and we want that for them too. That’s why we have created the TeachTatic IEP Internet Safety and Usage goal list. This list is written to teach and support students with special needs as they learn how to navigate and become successful, technologically savvy adults.


The world is changing, and it’s more important than ever for our children to know how to use technology safely and responsibly. That’s why our team of experts has created this comprehensive list of goals specifically designed to help students succeed online.


With the right tools in place, students can thrive in the digital age. We believe that every student should have access to the education they need to be successful in life – no matter their abilities or challenges. View full goal bank here


What is internet safety for kids in special education?

Internet safety is about more than just keeping children away from inappropriate content. It’s also about teaching kids how to use technology responsibly and safely. This includes everything from cyberbullying and online predators to managing digital footprints and personal information.


Why is an internet iep goal important for student safety?

IEP goals for internet safety are important because they help ensure that students with special needs are able to access the same education and opportunities as their peers. By teaching kids how to use technology safely and responsibly, we can help them avoid some of the common pitfalls associated with the online world.


How can IEP goals for internet safety be used in the classroom?

IEP goals for internet safety can be used in a variety of ways in the classroom. They can be used to create lesson plans, activities, and assignments. Additionally, they can be used to create goals and objectives for IEP students.



How can a special education teacher use these goals in IEPs?

These goals can be used as a starting point for discussions about internet safety with your IEP team. They can also be used to create goals and objectives for your student’s IEP.

  1. Understand and follow the rules for safe and responsible internet use.

  2. Develop and maintain a positive online reputation.

  3. Protect personal information online.

  4. Understand and avoid online predators and cyberbullying.

  5. Use technology to enhance learning and academic performance.

  6. Be aware of digital footprints and manage them appropriately.

  7. Use technology to communicate effectively and respectfully.

  8. Respect copyright laws and intellectual property rights.

What resources are available to help me implement these goals?

Various resources are available to help you implement these goals in your classroom. First and foremost are TeachTastic IEP goal bank sections for nonacademic IEP goals.

  1. Internet Predator Safety

  2. Cell Phone Usage

  3. Email

  4. Social Media

  5. Photo Sharing

Secondly, The internet is a great resource for finding lesson plans, activities, and assignments. Additionally, there are many books and articles that can be found online or at your local library to help you implement these goals.

Safewise - Internet Safety Guide for Kids

Kids Helth - Internet Safety

We hope you find these goals helpful and wish you the best of luck in helping your students navigate the digital world!


Responsible for internet use for students with special needs

The internet is a beautiful thing. It gives us access to a wealth of information and allows us to connect with people from all over the world. However, it also has its dangers. For students with special needs, there are some things they need to understand and rules they need to follow in order to stay safe and responsible while using the internet.

First, they need to be aware of cyberbullying. This is when someone uses the internet to deliberately hurt or embarrass another person. It can take many forms, such as mean comments on social media, spreading rumors online, or sending harassing emails or text messages. If they are the victim of cyberbullying, it's important to tell a trusted adult so they can help them deal with the situation.


Second, they need to be careful about what personal information they share online. This includes their full name, address, phone number, and any photos or videos that could reveal their identity. They should only share this information with people they know and trust. Additionally, you should never meet someone you've met online in person without first talking to a parent or guardian.


Finally, it's important to be aware of internet predators. These are people who use the internet to try to exploit children, usually for sexual purposes. They may pose as a child or teenager in order to gain a child's trust and then try to get them to meet up with them in person. It's important to talk to your child about stranger danger and make sure they know never to meet someone they've met online.


Here are 16 IEP goals for internet safety and usage to guide your students


Internet safety rules list


By (date), given a set of internet safety rules, the student will be able to follow each rule and describe why each rule is important, demonstrating an understanding of responsible internet use from 0/10 practice scenarios to 10/10 practice scenarios, as measured by teacher observation and work sample data collection.


Email Safety for Students with Special Needs

E-mail evaluating email attachments IEP goals


By (date), when given a sample email, the student will be able to open the email and use a safety checklist to evaluate if the attachment is safe to open, improving internet safety skills from 0/10 practice scenarios out of ten to 8/10 practice scenarios, as measured by teacher observation and work sample data collection.


It's no secret that the internet can be a dangerous place. With all of the malware, viruses, and phishing scams out there, it's important for everyone - especially children with special needs - to know how to stay safe online.


E-mail - evaluating links IEP goals


By (date), when given a sample email, the student will be able to open the email and use a safety checklist to evaluate if the link is safe to open, improving internet safety skills from 0/10 practice scenarios out of ten to 8/10 practice scenarios, as measured by teacher observation and work sample data collection.


E-mail - evaluating sender IEP goals