5 Major 3rd Grade Math IEP Goals Special Education | TeachTastic IEPs

Updated: Apr 9

Are you a 3rd-grade math teacher who hates writing iep goals?

TeachTastic has the perfect math goals for 3rd grade. You won’t have to waste time writing them on your own anymore! These quarterly objectives are written with full-year learning progression in mind. This saves time when everything is already mapped out and all you have to do is teach.


Five Major Goals for 3rd-Grade Math

All students, regardless of ability level, are held to the same Common Core Standards or individual state standards in third grade math. However, for students with special needs, there are five major goals that must be accomplished in order to ensure success in the coming 4th-grade curriculum. These goals include mastering multiplication skills, being able to solve word problems, and being proficient in addition and subtraction within 1000. By accomplishing these goals, special education students will be prepared for success in all future grade levels.


Here are those goals, as well as a look at how they reflect the needs of special education students in general. These are not specific to one standard or another but rather what all states generally agree on as five major goals or math skills to master.

  1. Addition and subtraction within 1000

  2. Multiplication facts products of whole numbers

  3. Place value up to three digits

  4. Write a fraction to a model, and model to fraction interchangeably

  5. Tell and write time to the nearest minute

Addition and subtraction within 1000:

One of the most important things that students need to master in 3rd grade is addition and subtraction within 1000. This goal includes mastering addition and subtraction facts within this range, as well as being able to solve problems using these operations. By mastering these skills, students will be able to solve more complex math problems with ease.


By (date), when given two three-digit numbers with sums no greater than 1000, the student will add numbers to find the sum, improving addition skills from 0/10 work samples out of ten consecutive trials to 8/10 work samples in ten consecutive trials.


Multiplication and division facts:

In order to understand more complex mathematical concepts, students learn a strong foundation in multiplication and division facts. These skills are essential for solving problems and mastering more difficult concepts in later grades. Teaching these facts in 3rd grade will help ensure that your students are prepared for the challenges ahead.


By (date), when given problems with multiplication, the student will interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each, improving operations and algebraic thinking skills from 0/10 work samples out of ten consecutive trials to 8/10 work samples in ten consecutive trials.

A big part of math at this grade level is introducing students to multiplication. IEP goals for third-grade multiplication include having students use array models to show equal groups. This helps them connect the dots between the equal groups and the visual representation of what it is to multiply. It also allows them to see how arrays can help solve word problems with situations involving equal groups. In other words, equal groups are a key component in understanding multiplication.


Lesson plans on multiplication with arrays can be a great way to help students learn and practice their math skills. An array is a set of numbers that are arranged in rows and columns. To multiply using an array, you need to find the product of the numbers in each row and column. For example, if you have an array with 2 rows and 3 columns, you would multiply 2x3 to get 6. You can then use this same method to teach lesson plans on multiplication with arrays with more rows and columns. This can be a great way to help students learn and practice their math skills. equal groups means that there are an equal number of items in each group. This is often used when dividing items into groups as well.


Once students have a firm grasp of array models, they can begin to apply their multiplication skills to solve problems involving the multiplication of larger numbers including decimals and fractions. By the end of third grade, students should be able to confidently multiply with array models to show equal groups.


Free multiplication chart/multiplication table for 3rd math | TeachTastic Publishing

MultiplicationChartUDLDesigned-1
.pdf
Download PDF • 37KB

Place value up to three digits:

Understanding place value is essential for mastering more complex mathematics concepts. In 3rd grade, students should be able to understand and work with numbers up to three digits. This understanding will lay the foundation for success in later grades and beyond.


Many special education lesson plans focus on teaching the round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100. This skill is essential for mastering all future mathematics concepts including many life skills. In addition, it helps students to develop number sense and understand place value. Round whole numbers can be taught using a variety of methods, including number lines, counters, and manipulative objects. However, it is important to choose a method that is appropriate for the student's level of understanding.


By (date), when given problems with place value, the student will round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100, improving numbers and operation in based ten skills from 0/10 work samples out of ten consecutive trials to 8/10 work samples in ten consecutive trials.


Fractions and decimals to tenths:

By 3rd grade, students should be able to understand fractions and decimals in terms of tenths. This understanding will help them solve problems and work with more complex fractions and decimals later on.


By (date), when given a fraction or model, the student will write a fraction to a model, and model to fraction interchangeably, improving fraction skills from 0/10 work samples out of ten consecutive trials to 8/10 work samples in ten consecutive trials.


Measurement:

In 3rd grade, students should start to develop an understanding of measurement. This includes concepts such as length, weight, capacity, and time. Developing a strong foundation in measurement will help students throughout their school career and beyond.


By (date), when given a clock, the student will tell and write time to the nearest minute, improving measurement of time skills from 0/10 work samples out of ten consecutive trials to 8/10 work samples in ten consecutive trials.


Teaching telling and writing time to the nearest minute is an essential life skill for all students, including those with special needs. Being able to tell time is a necessary life skill that helps people function independently. It is also an important mathematical skill, as it helps develop an understanding of concepts like measurement and estimation. For students with special needs, telling time can be especially challenging. However, there are some effective strategies that special education teachers can use to help their students master this skill. One approach is to use visual aids, such as clocks and calendars, to help students understand the concept of time.


All of these goals are essential for students to learn in 3rd grade. However, they are not the only skills that students need to learn. There are many other important concepts and skills that students should learn in order to be successful in math. These include but are not limited to:

  1. Knowing how to read and write a number line

  2. Understanding what operations can be performed with addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division

  3. Being able to solve word problems

  4. Understanding concepts of geometry and measurement

We know that teachers don’t have time to waste, which is why we created these free must-have IEP math goals for 3rd grade. They save you time when all you need is something that works perfectly from day one of teaching this quarter. It will make your life easier and more productive, so what are you waiting for?


TeachTastic has created a 3rd Grade Math IEP Goals for K-3 that are unique and can be tailored to your needs. The five major goals listed above cover the basics of what any student with an Individualized Education Program (IEP) must accomplish by the end of third grade, whether they're in special education or not. These yearly objectives will save you time when everything is already mapped out and all you have to do is teach!


This article was written by TeachTasticiep, a mathematics education expert and curriculum developer.


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