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  • Teachers Collaborative @ TeachTasticIEP

How To Create A Classroom Economy That Keeps Kids Motivated

Updated: Mar 11, 2022


If you are a teacher who has struggled with classroom management, this blog post is for you! We are going to share some of the most common challenges teachers face when it comes to managing their classrooms. To solve these problems, I highly recommend implementing well-developed classroom jobs and a classroom economy system.


When it comes to managing a classroom, some of the most common problems we hear about from teachers are:

1) lack of respect students have for their learning space,

2) desire to maintain a more organized classroom, and

3) kids not working to their full potential


Oftentimes, these problems can be solved by implementing two key strategies: well-developed classroom jobs, and a classroom economy system.

When it comes to developing well-rounded classroom jobs, I recommend giving each student 3-5 different tasks to complete throughout the day. These tasks should be rotated on a daily or weekly basis so that all students have a chance to experience every job.


Defining and Hiring for classroom jobs

Classroom economies can help motivate students while teaching them important real-world skills.

  • By allowing students to be hired for classroom jobs, they can learn detailed responsibilities and feel a sense of ownership over their learning space.

  • Classroom economies connect classroom jobs to the real world, giving students a valuable hands-on experience.

  • Students get paid a salary for each job, which they can save up, or spend to purchase class passes that unlock special in-class experiences.

One of the best things about setting up a classroom economy is that it can be tailored to fit your specific needs as a teacher. You can decide which jobs you want to offer, how much students will get paid, and what they can use their earnings for. Below are a few tips to help you get started:

Define the jobs you want to offer.

Some examples of classroom jobs include:

  • Stamping papers

  • Passing out materials

  • Line leader

  • Taking attendance

  • Sharpening pencils

  • Librarian

  • Germ Buster (doorknobs and handles)

  • Chair Stacker

  • Table washer

  • Whiteboard cleaner

  • Carpet checker

Define application process

Students can apply for jobs by submitting a resume and cover letter. By allowing students to be hired for classroom jobs, they can learn detailed responsibilities and feel a sense of ownership over their learning space.

Decide how much students will get paid.

You can choose to pay your students a fixed salary, or based on the number of tasks they complete. For example, you might give stude